Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

In George Bush and his Marxist Handlers, an article in  The Spectator [ page 43 on 5 November 2005 - a significant date for Parliament  and Guy FawkesJohn Laughland tells us that:-

QUOTE
 Instead, according to Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the ‘soul of Marxism’ lies in something called dialectical materialism. Derived from Hegel and ultimately Heraclitus, this doctrine holds that the world is in a constant state of flux, that nothing is absolutely true or false, and that everything is connected to everything else. Permanent revolution is consequently the natural state of reality, and hence of politics. Because flux is the natural state, Marx, Engels and Lenin all reasoned that all fixed forms of political association, i.e., the state, were oppressive, and that men would not be free until the state itself had ‘withered away’.
UNQUOTE

Aleks was not, is not and never will be a communist subversive. He has good reason not love communism. He saw it close to. He was also a victim thereof, not that people in the USSR were not victims but he was one of the millions who went to prison. Being one of the smaller number that lived to tell the tale is a plus point. Actually telling the tale and getting noticed worldwide was another. He got a Nobel Peace Prize which is fairly meaningless and out of Russia which mattered. He also annoyed the Russian government but they couldn't murder him because he was too well known.

The relevance of this issue is that he knew what the post Marxists and the Zionists  were doing so he was side lined, written out of politics to keep us ignorant. Keeping the peasants ignorant is the first rule of subversion.

 

200 Years Together
Is the great book from the great man and in English to boot. Sadly it is only Chapter 20 but it is distinctly revealing. It tells us just how much better off the Jews were in the Russian prison camps of the Gulag.
PS More chapters have been translated. More of a very ugly story is coming to light.

 

Solzhenitsyn interviewed by Lydia Chukovskaya about "200 Years Together" for OrthodoxyToday.org  [ 1-7 January  2003 ]
Orthodoxy Today is a Jewish operation but the tone sounds quite reasonable. Volume I is out. Volume II is being worked on. What does not get a mention is that the book has not been translated into English and given the Jewish stranglehold on publishing it likely never will. The most savage criticism came his way before the book was published. They didn't need to read it to know that they hated what he was going to tell them.

QUOTE
He has been criticized by some who consider him a radical; according to their claims he frequently makes connections between the activities of Jews, Georgians and Latvians and the causes of the mishaps that befell Russia in the 20th century.

Solzhenitsyn's two-volume book 200 Years Together (partially based on his 1968 manuscript Jews in USSR and in the Future Russia, in which he uses expressions such as "Lenin-Jewish revolution"[2],[3],[4]) is considered by many to be anti-Semitic. Several books and series of articles have been written to refute particular claims made by Solzhenitsyn in his work (e.g. [5],[6]).
UNQUOTE ex Wikipedia. See below.

 

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.

(Redirected from Alexander Solzhenitsyn)

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn (Алекса́ндр Иса́евич Солжени́цын) (born December 11, 1918) is a Russian novelist, dramatist and historian. He was responsible for thrusting awareness of the Gulag on the non-Soviet world.

He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1970 and was exiled from the Soviet Union in 1974.

Born in Kislovodsk, Russia, Solzhenitsyn fought in the Red Army during World War II. He became a captain before he was arrested in 1945 for ASA or Anti-Soviet agitation, criticizing Joseph Stalin in letters to his brother-in-law. He was imprisoned for eight years, from 1945 to 1953, under the Article 58 law.

He spent some time at hard manual work in labor camps of the Gulag. He wrote about this in One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and The Gulag Archipelago. Then he spent time in a sharashka, a white-collar prison labor compound. He wrote about this in The First Circle.

Solzhenitsyn was exiled from the Soviet Union for his book The Gulag Archipelago.


Solzhenitsyn was exiled from the Soviet Union for his book The Gulag Archipelago.

According to Leonid Samutin's book Do Not Create an Idol, Solzhenitsyn voluntarily became an informant and lied or kept back the facts about this in his books. [1] Leonid Samutin was a staunch anti-communist and knew Solzhenitsyn since they met in the camp. In 1970s at the request of the author Samutin kept the manuscript of The Gulag Archipelago hiding it from KGB.

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich brought the Soviet system of forced labor (which existed during Stalin's rule) to the attention of the West, but it was his monumental history of the massive Soviet concentration camps for both criminal and political prisoners that won him the most acclaim. No longer was this an issue for anti-communists only - all Western democracies had to confront it. The Soviets, for their part, pointed out that the camps of the Gulag had been gradually closed down during the 1950s and the Gulag itself had been abolished by the MVD order 20 of January 25, 1960.

On February 13, 1974, Solzhenitsyn was deported from the Soviet Union to West Germany and stripped of his Soviet citizenship. The KGB had found the manuscript for the first part of The Gulag Archipelago. Less than a week later, the Soviets carried out reprisals against Yevgeny Yevtushenko for his support of Solzhenitsyn.

After a time in Switzerland, Solzhenitsyn was given accommodation by Stanford University to "facilitate [your] work, and to accommodate you and your family" He stayed on the 11th floor of the Hoover Tower, part of the Hoover Institution. Solzhenitsyn moved to Vermont in 1976. Over the next 18 years, spent mostly in rural seclusion, Solzhenitsyn completed his historical cycle of the Russian Revolution of 1917, The Red Wheel, and several shorter works. In 1990 his Soviet citizenship was restored, and in 1994 he returned to Russia.

Despite an enthusiastic welcome on his first arrival in America, followed by respect for his privacy, he had never been comfortable outside his homeland. However radical he might have been in the USSR, outside that context he appeared to some to be a reactionary, particularly in his Russian nationalism and his religious orthodoxy.

In May 1997, Solzhenitsyn was elected full member (academician) of the Russian Academy of Science. In 1997 he established his own prize in literature ($25,000). Alexander Solzhenitsyn met with President Boris Yeltsin in 1994 and President Vladimir Putin in 2000. He met Putin again in 2002.

He has been criticized by some who consider him a radical; according to their claims he frequently makes connections between the activities of Jews, Georgians and Latvians and the causes of the mishaps that befell Russia in the 20th century.

Solzhenitsyn's two-volume book 200 Years Together (partially based on his 1968 manuscript Jews in USSR and in the Future Russia, in which he uses expressions such as "Lenin-Jewish revolution"[2],[3],[4]) is considered by many to be anti-Semitic. Several books and series of articles have been written to refute particular claims made by Solzhenitsyn in his work (e.g. [5],[6]).

His ex-wife Nastasya Reshetovskaya wrote a book about her life with Alexander Solzhenitsyn. In it she described his purported extramarital love affairs and claimed that he begged her to allow him to continue them, as he felt they inspired his writing. Reshetovskaya also revealed the angst she experienced from her former husband's literary fame and partly blamed it for the demise of the marriage. She expressed her opinion that in The First Circle, Solzhenitsyn exaggerated the conditions of Soviet life as they affected relations between men and women.

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Published works

Main article: Alexandr Solzhenitsyn bibliography

 

[edit]

External links

 

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Updated  on  Friday, 07 September 2012 18:06:08