International Criminal Court

The International Criminal Court is an operation which has the ostensible purpose of dispensing justice to various deeply unpleasant criminals. The reality is rather different. A similar outfit is the International Court of Justice set up by the United Nations. That deals more with civil disputes albeit covering illegal wars such as the American attacks on Nicaragua. What is interesting about these setups is which governments refuse to play by the rules. Even more important is which people not get charged. See  Signatories And Criminal States on the point.

Criminals from small countries get charged, tried and convicted. Those from important countries like America do not. Is this favouritism, corruption, abuse of power? If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, tastes like a duck it might well be a duck.

Various foreigners have noticed; it is difficult not to, unless your Main Stream Media are hiding the truth. That is why Mahathir Mohamad, the prime minister of Malaysia instituted the Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Commission, which has convicted Bush, Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, Deputy Assistant Attorneys General John Yoo and Jay Bybee, Alberto Gonzales, and former counselors David Addington and William Haynes II of conspiracy to commit war crimes, specifically torture. They were then referred to the ICC, which proved collective corruption by ignoring them.

That reality was demonstrated again when the KLWCC tribunal convicted the State of Israel guilty of genocide of the Palestinian people and convicted former Israeli general Amos Yaron for crimes against humanity and genocide for his involvement in the Sabra and Shatila massacre.[12]

The  Main Stream Media that studiously ignores malpractice also did a total blackout on Obama's use of a Forged Birth Certificate.

Rome Statute ex Wiki
QUOTE
The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court...... or the Rome Statute) is the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC). It was adopted at a diplomatic conference in Rome on 17 July 1998[5][6] and it entered into force on 1 July 2002.[2] As of 6 January 2015, 123 states are party to the statute.[2] Among other things, the statute establishes the court's functions, jurisdiction and structure.

The Rome Statute established four core international crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. Those crimes "shall not be subject to any statute of limitations".[7] Under the Rome Statute, the ICC can only investigate and prosecute the four core international crimes in situations where states are "unable" or "unwilling" to do so themselves.
UNQUOTE
It is a wide ranging set up for dealing with vicious politicians & other rogues. Blair, Brown, Bush, Cameron, Obama & Netanyahu are just a few prime candidates for justice and the gallows.

 

International Criminal Court ex Wiki
QUOTE
The International Criminal Court[2] is an intergovernmental organization and international tribunal that sits in The Hague in the Netherlands. The ICC has the jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the international crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. The ICC is intended to complement existing national judicial systems and it may therefore only exercise its jurisdiction when certain conditions are met, such as when national courts are unwilling or unable to prosecute criminals or when the United Nations Security Council or individual states refer investigations to the Court. The ICC began functioning on 1 July 2002, the date that the Rome Statute entered into force. The Rome Statute is a multilateral treaty which serves as the ICC's foundational and governing document. States which become party to the Rome Statute, for example by ratifying it, become member states of the ICC. Currently, there are 122 states which are party to the Rome Statute and therefore members of the ICC.

The ICC has four principal organs: the Presidency, the Judicial Divisions, the Office of the Prosecutor, and the Registry. The President is the most senior judge chosen by his or her peers in the Judicial Division, which hears cases before the Court. The Office of the Prosecutor is headed by the Prosecutor who investigates crimes and initiates proceedings before the Judicial Division. The Registry is headed by the Registrar and is charged with managing all the administrative functions of the ICC, including the headquarters, detention union, and public defense office.

The Office of the Prosecutor has opened nine official investigations and is also conducting an additional nine preliminary examinations. Thus far, 36 individuals have been indicted in the ICC, including Ugandan rebel leader Joseph Kony, Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir, Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, and Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo. Since all of the official investigations have been in Africa, the Office of the Prosecutor has been accused of selective enforcement and Western imperialism towards African countries.
UNQUOTE
The accusation that it is only big fish in small ponds that get leaned on is entirely sound.

 

International Court of Justice ex Wiki
The International Court of Justice ( commonly referred to as the World Court or ICJ) is the primary judicial branch of the United Nations. It is based in the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands. Its main functions are to settle legal disputes submitted to it by states and to provide advisory opinions on legal questions submitted to it by duly authorized international branches, agencies, and the UN General Assembly.......

The Court's workload covers a wide range of judicial activity. After the court ruled that the U.S.'s covert war against Nicaragua was in violation of international law (Nicaragua v. United States), the United States withdrew from compulsory jurisdiction in 1986. The United States accepts the court's jurisdiction only on a case-by-case basis.[3] Chapter XIV of the United Nations Charter authorizes the UN Security Council to enforce Court rulings. However, such enforcement is subject to the veto power of the five permanent members of the Council, which the United States used in the Nicaragua case.

Parties and signatories of the Rome Statute

  State party
  Signatory that has not ratified
  Non-state party, non-signatory
 

Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Commission ex Wiki
The Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Commission (KLWCT), also known as the Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Tribunal, is a Malaysian organisation established in 2007 by Mahathir Mohamad to investigate war crimes.[1][2] The KLWCC was instigated as an alternative to the International Criminal Court in The Hague, which Mahathir accused of bias in its selection of cases to cover.[3]

The governance body of the KLWCT was established to oversee and investigate complaints from victims of wars and armed conflict in relation to crimes against peace, war crimes, crimes against humanity and other like offences as recognized under International Law.[4] Members of the governance body include:

Convictions invoking universal jurisdiction
In November 2011 the tribunal purportedly exercised universal jurisdiction to try in absentia former US President George W. Bush and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, convicting both for crimes against peace because of what the tribunal concluded was the unlawful invasion of Iraq.[7][8][9]

In May 2012 after hearing testimony for a week from victims of torture at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, the tribunal unanimously convicted in absentia former President Bush, former Vice President Dick Cheney, former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, former Deputy Assistant Attorneys General John Yoo and Jay Bybee, former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, and former counselors David Addington and William Haynes II of conspiracy to commit war crimes, specifically torture.[10] The tribunal referred their findings to the chief prosecutor at the International Court of Justice in the Hague.[11]

In November 2013, the tribunal convicted State of Israel guilty of genocide of the Palestinian people and convicted former Israeli general Amos Yaron for crimes against humanity and genocide for his involvement in the Sabra and Shatila massacre.[12]

 

George Bush and Tony Blair are Officially War Criminals
Officially and genuinely but they won't get justice any time soon.

 

Rome Statute Articles 1 - 128
Article. 6 covers Genocide as used by Her Majesty's Government
Article 7 covers crimes against humanity of the sort being used Israel.
Article 8 Article 8 covers war crimes of the sort being used by America at GITMO
Article 15Article 15 covers the Prosecutor's role
Article 25 Article 25 covers individual responsibility; typical perpetrators include Blair, Brown, Bush, Cameron, Obama & Netanyahu.
Article 27 says this law applies to heads of state
Article 58 says that the Prosecutor issues warrants based on information received.
Article 86 says governments are obliged to cooperate fully with the court investigation & prosecution

 

Signatories And Criminal States
The latter are nervous about 'justice' & legal processes when they are not in a position to pervert them. They include America, Burma, China, Israel, Russia, Saudi Arabia & the Sudan.

 


Israeli Prime Minister May Be Charged With War Crimes [ 10 January 2015 ]
The International Criminal Court was set up to deal with War Crimes. Its customers have a lot in common. They are not just vicious criminals, not just blatantly guilty; they all come from little countries with little influence. That is why Netanyahu will never be charged, let alone convicted, sentenced or hanged. The whole process is far too political for that. At worst Netanyahu will use the American veto to Pervert The Course Of Justice. Netanyahu is not the only vicious mass murder walking free with government protection. Blair, Brown, Bush, Cameron & Obama are just some of the obvious examples.

 

International Criminal Court Considers Israeli War Crimes [ 18 January 2015 ]
QUOTE
Palestinian leaders joined the International Criminal Court in an attempt to pursue war crimes charges against Israel yesterday, a day after their bid for statehood was defeated at the United Nations Security Council.

President Mahmoud Abbas signed the Palestinian request to join the world court despite warnings from the United States and Israel that it would risk a new confrontation and damage future negotiations towards the establishment of a Palestinian state.
UNQUOTE
The Times refers rather coyly to Israeli 'war crimes' as though their 'evil' was not blatantly obvious but then 'Murdoch' has a rather cozy relationship with Zionist crazies. The Zionist Occupation Government [ ZOG ], which is the American puppet regime panders to evil. It is putting the frighteners on. See e.g. Palestinians To Join International Criminal Court Defying Zionist & US Threats.

 

International Criminal Court Uses Black To Investigate Israeli Psychopaths [   25 January 2015 ]

Meet Fatou Bensouda. Presumably she is not as stupid as she looks. Finding evil in Israel is not difficult.

 

Articles 1- 128
Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, 17 July 1998
State parties (123) State signatories (31)
The United Nations has been considering the establishment of a permanent international criminal court since its creation. After years of negotiations, a Diplomatic Conference was held from 15 June to 17 July 1998 in Rome which finalised and adopted the Statute for the International Criminal Court (ICC). The Statute was finally adopted by a vote where 120 were in favour, 7 against and 21 abstained.

The establishment of an ICC represents a major progress for better implementation of international humanitarian law and a clear step forward in the battle against impunity. Hence, for the Court to be truly effective, a very large number of States must ratify the Statute.

The ICC will be established in the Hague and will have jurisdiction over suspected perpetrators of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes or aggression, including superiors or military commanders. The Court may exercise its jurisdiction, if the State on the territory of which the act or omission occurred or the State of nationality of the suspect is Party to the Statute or has accepted the jurisdiction of the Court. The Prosecutor can refer cases proprio motu ( on his/her own initiative). The Court has not a retroactive effect.

The ICC is not intended to take over jurisdiction exercised by national courts: the ICC is intended to exercise its jurisdiction only when the state is unwilling or genuinely unable to prosecute. States continue to have the primary duty to prosecute suspected war criminals before theirs own courts.

Preamble
Art. 1 The Court
Art. 2
Relationship of the Court with the United Nations
Art. 3
Seat of the Court
Art. 4
Legal status and powers of the Court
Art. 5
Crimes within the jurisdiction of the Court
Art. 6
Genocide
Art. 7 Crimes against humanity
Art. 8 War crimes
Art. 9
Elements of Crimes
Art. 10
Jurisdiction, Admissibility and Applicable Law
Art. 11
Jurisdiction ratione temporis
Art. 12 Preconditions to the exercise of jurisdiction
Art. 13
Exercise of jurisdiction
Art. 14 Referral of a situation by a State Party
Art. 15 Prosecutor
Art. 16
Deferral of investigation or prosecution
Art. 17 Issues of admissibility
Art. 18
Preliminary rulings regarding admissibility
Art. 19 Challenges to the jurisdiction of the Court or the admissibility of a case
Art. 20 Ne bis in idem
Art. 21 Applicable law
Art. 22
Nullum crimen sine lege
Art. 23
Nulla poena sine lege
Art. 24
Non-retroactivity ratione personae
Art. 25
Individual criminal responsibility
Art. 26
Exclusion of jurisdiction over persons under eighteen
Art. 27 Irrelevance of official capacity
Art. 28
Responsibility of commanders and other superiors
Art. 29
Non-applicability of statute of limitations
Art. 30
Mental element
Art. 31 Grounds for excluding criminal responsibility
Art. 32
Mistake of fact or mistake of law
Art. 33
Superior orders and prescription of law
Art. 34
Organs of the Court
Art. 35 Service of judges
Art. 36
Qualifications, nomination and election of judges
Art. 37 Judicial vacancies
Art. 38
The Presidency
Art. 39
Chambers
Art. 40
Independence of the judges
Art. 41
Excusing and disqualification of judges
Art. 42 The Office of the Prosecutor
Art. 43
The Registry
Art. 44
Staff
Art. 45 Solemn undertaking
Art. 46
Removal from office
Art. 47 Disciplinary measures
Art. 48 Privileges and immunities
Art. 49 Salaries, allowances and expenses
Art. 50
Official and working languages
Art. 51
Rules of Procedure and Evidence
Art. 52 Regulations of the Court
Art. 53 Initiation of an investigation
Art. 54
Duties and powers of the Prosecutor with respect to investigations
Art. 55 Rights of persons during an investigation
Art. 56
Role of the Pre-Trial Chamber in relation to a unique investigative opportunity
Art. 57
Functions and powers of the Pre-Trial Chamber
Art. 58 Issuance by the Pre-Trial Chamber of a warrant of arrest or a summons to appear
Art. 59 Arrest proceedings in the custodial State
Art. 60
Initial proceedings before the Court
Art. 61 Confirmation of the charges before trial
Art. 62
Place of trial
Art. 63 Trial in the presence of the accused
Art. 64
Functions and powers of the Trial Chamber
Art. 65 Proceedings on an admission of guilt
Art. 66
Presumption of innocence
Art. 67 Rights of the accused
Art. 68 Protection of the victims and witnesses and their participation in the proceedings
Art. 69
Evidence
Art. 70
Offences against the administration of justice
Art. 71
Sanctions for misconduct before the Court
Art. 72
Protection of national security information
Art. 73
Third-party information or documents
Art. 74
Requirements for the decision
Art. 75
Reparations to victims
Art. 76
Sentencing
Art. 77
Applicable penalties
Art. 78
Determination of the sentence
Art. 79 Trust Fund
Art. 80
Non-prejudice to national application of penalties and national laws
Art. 81
Appeal against decision of acquittal or conviction or against sentence
Art. 82
Appeal against other decisions
Art. 83
Proceedings on appeal
Art. 84 Revision of conviction or sentence
Art. 85 Compensation to an arrested or convicted person
Art. 86
General obligation to cooperate
Art. 87
Requests for cooperation: general provisions
Art. 88
Availability of procedures under national law
Art. 89
Surrender of persons to the Court
Art. 90
Competing requests
Art. 91 Contents of request for arrest and surrender
Art. 92
Provisional arrest
Art. 93 Other forms of cooperation
Art. 94 Postponement of execution of a request in respect of ongoing investigation or prosecution
Art. 95 Postponement of execution of a request in respect of an admissibility challenge
Art. 96 Contents of request for other forms of assistance under article 93
Art. 97 Consultations
Art. 98
Cooperation with respect to waiver of immunity and consent to surrender
Art. 99
Execution of requests under articles 93 and 96
Art. 100
Costs
Art. 101
Rule of speciality
Art. 102
Use of terms
Art. 103
Role of States in enforcement of sentences of imprisonment
Art. 104
Change in designation of State of enforcement
Art. 105
Enforcement of the sentence
Art. 106
Supervision of enforcement of sentences and conditions of imprisonment
Art. 107
Transfer of the person upon completion of sentence
Art. 108
Limitation on the prosecution or punishment of other offences
Art. 109
Enforcement of fines and forfeiture measures
Art. 110 Review by the Court concerning reduction of sentence
Art. 111
Escape
Art. 112
Assembly of States Parties
Art. 113
Financial Regulations
Art. 114
Payment of expenses
Art. 115
Funds of the Court and of the Assembly of States Parties
Art. 116
Voluntary contributions
Art. 117
Assessment of contributions
Art. 118
Annual audit
Art. 119
Settlement of disputes
Art. 120
Reservations
Art. 121 Amendments
Art. 122 Amendments to provisions of an institutional nature
Art. 123
Review of the Statute
Art. 124 Transitional Provision
Art. 125 Signature, ratification, acceptance, approval or accession
Art. 126
Entry into force
Art. 127 Withdrawal
Art. 128
Authentic texts